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Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation in early-stage dementia: study protocol for a multi-centre single-blind randomised controlled trial (GREAT)


Clare, Linda, Bayer, Antony, Burns, Alistair, Corbett, Anne, Jones, Roy, Knapp, Martin, Kopelman, Michael, Kudlicka, Aleksandra, Leroi, Iracema, Oyebode, Jan, Pool, Jackie, Woods, Bob, Whitaker, Rhiannon


Trials, Volume: 14, Pages.: 152-152

Year of Publication



Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation (CR) may be a clinically effective intervention for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, vascular or mixed dementia and their carers. This study aims to establish whether CR is a clinically effective and cost-effective intervention for people with early-stage dementia and their carers.; Methods/design: In this multi-centre, single-blind randomised controlled trial, 480 people with early-stage dementia, each with a carer, will be randomised to receive either treatment as usual or cognitive rehabilitation (10 therapy sessions over 3 months, followed by 4 maintenance sessions over 6 months). We will compare the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation with that of treatment as usual with regard to improving self-reported and carer-rated goal performance in areas identified as causing concern by people with early-stage dementia; improving quality of life, self-efficacy, mood and cognition of people with early-stage dementia; and reducing stress levels and ameliorating quality of life for carers of participants with early-stage dementia. The incremental cost-effectiveness of goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation compared to treatment as usual will also be examined.; Discussion: If the study confirms the benefits and cost-effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation, it will be important to examine how the goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation approach can most effectively be integrated into routine health-care provision. Our aim is to provide training and develop materials to support the implementation of this approach following trial completion.;

Bibtex Citation

@article{Clare_2013, doi = {10.1186/1745-6215-14-152}, url = {}, year = 2013, publisher = {Springer Nature}, volume = {14}, number = {1}, pages = {152}, author = {Linda Clare and Antony Bayer and Alistair Burns and Anne Corbett and Roy Jones and Martin Knapp and Michael Kopelman and Aleksandra Kudlicka and Iracema Leroi and Jan Oyebode and Jackie Pool and Bob Woods and Rhiannon Whitaker}, title = {Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation in early-stage dementia: study protocol for a multi-centre single-blind randomised controlled trial ({GREAT})}, journal = {Trials} }


affect, caregivers, clinical protocols, cognition, cognitive, cognitive therapy, dementia, diagnosis, economics, goals, great britain, health care costs, humans, patient satisfaction, prevention & control, psychology, quality of life, rehabilitation, research design, self efficacy, stress, psychological, time factors, treatment outcome

Countries of Study


Types of Dementia

Dementia (general / unspecified)

Types of Study

Economic evaluation, Randomised Controlled Trial

Type of Outcomes

ADLs/IADLs, Behaviour, Cognition, Quality of Life of Carer, Quality of Life of Person With Dementia, Service use or cost reductions (incl. hospital use reduction, care home admission delay)



Type of Interventions

Non-pharmacological Treatment

Risk Factor Modifications

At risk population

Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions

Behavioural Therapies